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Roadside workers want to remind you to move over at Spirit Ride event

First responders and tow truck drivers are usually the people you see on the side of a busy interstate, but this time they came together for the Spirit Ride, a national project stressing the importance of move-over laws.

DOUGLAS COUNTY, Ore. - A traveling memorial to raise awareness about "Move Over" laws has made its way to Douglas County, hoping to honor those who were lost.

First responders and tow truck drivers are usually the people you see on the side of a busy interstate, but this time they came together for the Spirit Ride, a national project stressing the importance of move-over laws.

"It only takes a split second to end somebodies career or life," said Joe Andrews, the owner of Joe's Towing and Recovery. "So really think about it."

In Oregon, the law requires drivers to move over a lane, or slow down when approaching any vehicle with flashing lights, including a tow truck. Organizers showcase a ceremonial casket to remind people what can happen if you don't move over.

"It catches your eye, definitely," said Mike Corbin, the Spirit Ride Ambassador. "It makes you think. Even though there's no one inside, the spirit of those who have fallen are inside,"

Corbin passed around a ceremonial baton during the event with beads mimicking the sound of a passing car, representing a moment in time that roadside workers may never get back.

For Andrews, this is a moment that is all too familiar.

"Sweeping. Cleaning glass up from a scene and a state policeman yelled something and I couldn't hear him clear, so I turned, I believe to my left, to see what he said and at that point I was struck in the shoulder with a mirror," said Andrews.

Andrews hopes this event inspires people to take one second to move over, so roadside workers and first responders can go hone safely at the end of the day.


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