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Students and parents brainstorm ways to spread kindness after Thurston 20th anniversary

Students and parents brainstorm ways to spread kindness after Thurston 20th anniversary

Monday marks 20 years since Kip Kinkel shot and killed his parents and two students at Thurston High School.

And to this day, the tragedy is a reminder for students to promote respect and kindness.

In 1998, a few days after the Thurston High School shooting, three fifth grade students from Centennial Elementary School wrote a Peace Pledge.

The statement pledges that their school will be violence free.

On Sunday, students and staff from Centennial Elementary recited that same pledge at Unitarian Universalist Church in Eugene in response to the mass shootings that have happened this year.

It outlines how students should treat their fellow classmates.

“Different abilities, or if they're just different, a lot of people treat them, just all over the world, treat them like they're nothing - when everybody’s something, and they do something, and they are something, so everybody should be treated equally,” Centennial Elementary student, Leila Kammerzeltmurphy, says.

The gathering was all part of the Spreading Kindness Workshop.

The free, community-organized workshop aims to promote leadership and active kindness to one another.

A University of Oregon professor says kindness is something built within us.

“In these times of decisiveness where we feel helpless, we can actually do kind things and have control over them and benefit ourselves and the people that receive the kindness,” UO professor Doug Carnine says.

At the workshop, students and parents also brainstormed ways to spread kindness in person and over social media.

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